BULLIES come in all ages

BULLIES come in all ages
(click to see movie trailer)

Surround yourself with positive people,
energy, and situations;
always avoid negativity.

~~~~~~~~~~

Life is too short to wake up with regrets.
So, love the people who treat you right.

Forgive, and then forget about the ones who don't.


Monday, August 18, 2008

Queen Ann's Lace-Not "Just a Weed"

The Queen Ann's Lace (AKA wild carrot) is prolific along the roadsides of North Georgia. Not many people know that QAL is a member of the parsley family. The seeds are used for many medicinal purposes.

According to holoweb.com:

"The seeds are a beneficial antiseptic diuretic useful in the treatment of cystitis and prostatitis. Also, the seeds are used for the prevention and washing out of gravel and urinary stones. As a diuretic, it helps with dropsy and the elimination of uric acid from the body (thus, used for gout). The seeds, which are high in volatile oil, are soothing to the digestive system, useful for colic and flatulence. Some herbalists employ the seeds as an implantation preventer. The root is very high in Vitamin A and minerals. The juice is reputed to have anti-cancer activity. The root helps to expel worms and is an effective antacid for heartburn and gastritis. A poultice of the root is excellent for first aid, especially for itchy skin. CAUTION: Queen Anne's Lace has several poisonous look alikes. Do NOT use this herb (seeds) with pregnancy."

Have you ever noticed the tiny purplish-black floweret in the center of the otherwise white flower? The black floweret is sterile and will not produce seed. It is not known why nature put it there, perhaps to attract pollinators.

I love this version of the origin of the purple center.

"Queen Anne was tatting white lace. (Tatting is the all-but-lost art of making lace by hand.) The beautiful white lace she was tatting became the white lacy flowers of the wild carrot plant. She pricked her finger and one drop of blood oozed out. This became the central dark red or purple sterile floret that is present on some, but not all, Queen Anne's Lace flowers.
Legends disagree as to which Queen Anne was tatting such lovely lace. Some say it was Anne (1574 - 1619), the first Stuart Queen Anne, who was brought over from Denmark at fourteen years of age to be a Queen to King James of Scotland. Others argue it was Anne (1665 - 1714), the daughter of William and Mary, and the last monarch in the Stuart line. Both Annes died in their forties!"
(davesgarden.com)


Hopefully, the next time you see Queen Ann's Lace on the side of the road, you won't think of it as "just a weed".